DecNef – Learning Through Brain Mapping “Matrix” Style


** SPOILER ALERT **  If you have not read Cohesion Lost but plan to, then do not read this.  It contains information that will spoil the plot.

Researchers: Adult early visual areas are sufficiently plastic to cause visual perceptual learning.
Credit: Nicolle Rager Fuller, National Science Foundation

In the novel Cohesion Lost, Tenbu and his classmates use plexus beds to relive the lives of historic figures.  What a way to learn history.   Historical dates are no longer abstract.  When was the battle of Waterloo?

If you use plexus learning, you don’t have to memorize dates and events, you live them.  You don’t just read about historic icons, you meet them.  The plexus bed contains microscopic connectors that connect to your spinal cord and replace what you feel with what your character feels in an historical simulation. Let’s say you just finished the simulation of the Napoleonic Wars and someone asks you, when was the battle of Waterloo?  That’s easy.  It feels like last month.  You were there.

Can this work for real? We may never get that far, but recent research shows promise in the area of imprint learning (at Boston University and ATR Computational Neuroscience Laboratories in Kyoto, Japan).  “The technique is called “Decoded Neurofeedback”, or “DecNef”, and it involves using decoded fMRI to induce brain activity patterns that match a known state” (Scott Young, MedGadget: “Matrix” Style Learning Through the Visual Cortex).

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** PLUG ALERT **

What will it be like future students with DecNef and plexus beds?

Read Cohesion Lost and find out.

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Press release from the National Science Foundation: Vision Scientists Demonstrate Innovative Learning Method

Journal article in Science: Perceptual Learning Incepted by Decoded fMRI Neurofeedback Without Stimulus Presentation

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